Description

The self-portrait shows no sign of losing its ability to capture the public imagination. It has the power to illuminate a range of shared concerns, from autobiography and authenticity to mythmaking and disguise.

This book investigates seven centuries of self-portraiture. Natalie Rudd casts fresh light on the international appeal of this most resilient genre, examining the historical contexts within which self-portraits developed and considering the significance of self-portraiture today, with illuminating commentaries on works by artists ranging from Michelangelo, Rembrandt van Rijn and Vincent van Gogh to Frida Kahlo, Cindy Sherman and Zanele Muholi.

In her vibrant and engaging text, Rudd maintains an inquisitive approach. She questions assumptions and embraces fresh perspectives, uncovering shifting concepts of selfhood in an age when we are interrogating notions of identity more than ever before